Vinyl

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While 8 years ago the majority of my time and money was spent on Etsy and clothing, now the majority of my time and money is spent on Discogs and vinyl. In the last couple years in particular, my record collection has grown almost exponentially, with new additions basically consisting of groups that make my mood and/or rabbit holes I’ve gone down that month quite obvious and traceable. And, since I basically missed the 80s and 90s while, let’s saying, being sequestered in the east wing, my purchasing trends often reflect the recent deaths of musicians who were active during that period and who I’m unfortunately just discovering.

So, since I’m enjoying keeping track of the books I’ve been reading throughout the year, I thought I’d add this page to do the same for the vinyl I’ve recently collected and am listening to on repeat. Since the list could get embarrassingly long if I just listed everything I’ve bought in the year, I’ll keep it to the Last 5 I’ve got and the Top 5 currently on my turntable, complete with links to their Discogs page (for the particular pressing I own). As with the books, I’ll bold any that I recommend. Just a warning that it’ll likely be all of them, as I do a lot of research before I buy…

Last 5

Top 5

  • Alice in Chains, Jar of Flies/Sap (Music on Vinyl reissue, 2010) (Double EP, including the 1992 acoustic gem, Sap, and the 1994 Jar of Flies. The absolute highlight of both discs is “Right Turn”, credited to ‘Alice Mudgarden’, i.e., members of Alice in Chains, Mudhoney, and Soundgarden. Chris Cornell’s vocals on this song give me chills every gorram time.)
  • Soundgarden, Screaming Life (Sub Pop, 1987)
  • Madhouse, 16 (Paisley Park, 1987) (It seems to be a rather unknown fact that Prince put out a few jazz albums under the band name ‘Madhouse’ [2 full albums, 8 and this one, and 3 singles, 6, (The Perfect) 10, and 13], the reason likely being his own attempts to hide the fact, not putting his name anywhere on the records and even having a full band play shows without him. But he did, in fact, play most of the instruments on the recordings, creating some of the funkiest jazz you’ll ever hear).
  • The Boys Next Door, Door, Door (Mushroom reissue, 1989) (What Nick Cave’s The Birthday Party started as. Brilliant album.)
  • David Bowie, Black Tie White Noise (BMG/Savage Records/Arista, 1993)