Norwegian Wood x Niels Kierulf

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While designers seem to be going like gangbusters on digital prints these days, I’ve found that I’m rather picky with which prints I like. Which may seem like a ‘duh-doy’ statement, but, if you take a close look around the internets/runways/stores, it seems as if you either have to be for or against digital prints as a singular style. Meaning, of course, that the masses really just approach digital prints on clothing as a trend. But there’s so much you can do with digital print, and so many images that are both wearable and pleasing to passersby, that if done well, it won’t just be a trend, but will allow for great collaborations between photographers and designers. Such as the newest Norwegian Wood mini-collection, being four pieces featuring four digital prints by Montreal photographer (/econ student/treeplanter), Niels Kierulf. Angie’s presentation of the photographs is exactly how I feel digital printed clothing should be done: either a) a simple simple everyday basic such as the crewneck sweatshirt, which allows the print to be shown off completely; or b) a dramatic statement piece such as the fringed kimono that is already sure of itself without the print, but with the print adds a whole other level of intrigue.

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My favorite parts about this collaboration are that the prints for the sweatshirts are printed (in the US) on US produced organic cotton, and that all four of the prints capture some spectacular pieces of Canadian nature. Very very happy right now that I managed to pick up a holiday job.

Here are the links to all four pieces (from bottom to top):

High Park (Toronto, ON) Fringe Kimono

Aspen II (Cottonwood Park, Fort St. James, BC) Fringe Kimono

Stuart Lake (Fort St. James, BC) Sweatshirt

Lush (Bella Coola, BC) Sweatshirt

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